Marine Matters issue 17 available now

Marine Matters issue 17 available now

The latest issue of the IMOS newsletter, Marine Matters, is available to download via the website. read more
Watch the new Argo animation

Watch the new Argo animation

The Argo stop-motion animation aims to inspire children (and adults) to engage with marine science. It is quirky, fun... read more
The ocean today is warmer, and sea levels higher, than at any time since the instrumental record began: State of the Climate 2014.

The ocean today is warmer, and sea levels higher, than at any time since the instrumental record began: State of the Climate 2014.

The CSIRO and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology have released their third State of the Climate report today. It... read more
IMOS and environmental research

IMOS and environmental research

The National Environmental Research Program's Peter Doherty (Tropical Ecosystems Hub Science Leader) and Nic Bax... read more
A new look for the IMOS Ocean Portal

A new look for the IMOS Ocean Portal

Today the IMOS Marine Information team is excited to release the new look IMOS Ocean Portal. The website has had a... read more
Warm wind gives swimmers a cold water shock

Warm wind gives swimmers a cold water shock

SEASONAL winds and currents have given east coast swimmers a shock this summer as cool subsurface water has made its...

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Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) was established in 2007 under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS), and was extended and enhanced through the Education Investment Fund (EIF) in 2009, and extended under the Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (CRIS) and NCRIS in 2013.

IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated national array of observing equipment to monitor the open oceans and coastal marine environment around Australia, covering physical, chemical and biological variables.

All IMOS data is freely and openly available through the IMOS Ocean Portal for the benefit of Australian marine and climate science as a whole. IMOS observations are guided by societal needs for improved ocean information, and focused through science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Australian marine and climate science community.

There are are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Multi-decadal ocean change; Climate variability and weather extremes; Major boundary currents and interbasin flows; Continental shelf processes; and Ecosystem responses.