Changing tides in ocean technology

Changing tides in ocean technology

IMOS Director, Tim Moltmann, has contributed an article to the Journal of Ocean Technology on recent technological... read more
IMOS recognised as a GOOS Regional Alliance

IMOS recognised as a GOOS Regional Alliance

At its most recent meeting in Paris, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO formally... read more
Australia’s new research vessel, the Investigator, will soon set sail for Hobart

Australia’s new research vessel, the Investigator, will soon set sail for Hobart

Delivery of the new Marine National Facility (MNF) research vessel took place on 4 August in Singapore. CSIRO, who... read more
Gliderscope Version 5 Released

Gliderscope Version 5 Released

New version of ANFOG's data-visualising software now available for download read more
IMOS infrastructure captures details of Tropical Cyclone ‘Ita’

IMOS infrastructure captures details of Tropical Cyclone ‘Ita’

In February, tropical Cyclone Ita carved a path from the Solomon Islands across Papua New Guinea and through northern... read more
Microbial sampling at IMOS National Reference Stations to be expanded

Microbial sampling at IMOS National Reference Stations to be expanded

In 2012 IMOS established a partnership with the Australian Marine Microbial Biodiversity Initiative (AMMBI) to run a... read more
Previous
Next

Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) was established in 2007 under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS), and was extended and enhanced through the Education Investment Fund (EIF) in 2009, and extended under the Collaborative Research Infrastructure Scheme (CRIS) and NCRIS in 2013.

IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated national array of observing equipment to monitor the open oceans and coastal marine environment around Australia, covering physical, chemical and biological variables.

All IMOS data is freely and openly available through the IMOS Ocean Portal for the benefit of Australian marine and climate science as a whole. IMOS observations are guided by societal needs for improved ocean information, and focused through science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Australian marine and climate science community.

There are are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Multi-decadal ocean change; Climate variability and weather extremes; Major boundary currents and interbasin flows; Continental shelf processes; and Ecosystem responses.